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Brazilian American singer-songwriter Monica da Silva drops a fresh new track today called “Soldado de Amor.” If her name sounds familiar it’s because we previously showcased Da Silva’s work through Complicated Animals, the duo she forms with Chad Alger.

Da Silva’s new song, which will form part of the upcoming debut album, Brasilissima, was co-written with her brother Bruce Driscoll who is known for his work with Freedom Fry and Blondfire. The track was inspired by “marchinhas” and the singalongs that go along with the genre of music heard in Brazilian Carnival.

Although samba is the most common type of music heard in Brazilian street parades, up until the 1960s, the marchas/marchinhas were more popular. In “A Cultural Encylopedia of Extraordinary and Exotic Customs from around the World,” Javier A. Galvan explains that, “The first marcha “O abre alas,” was created by Chiquinha Gonzaga in 1899 for the cordao Rosa de Ouro. It is known as the first song to be written specifically for carnival.” Later, in the 30s and 40s, the now classic marchas and sambas were composed and remain popular today.

Da Silva’s sultry and impassioned voice on Soldier of Love evokes memories of Caetano’s Tropicalia. The track is so captivating it’s already being featured on the BBC Drama “The Replacement.” We can’t wait to see what she has in store for us in her upcoming release, Brasilissima. 

Take a listen and immerse yourself in these mesmerizing sounds…

Da Silva’s music has been featured on The World Cup, TED, Ibiza Beats, and Putumayo World Music’s “Brazilian Beat.”  She also composes music and regularly performs with guitarist and producer Chad Alger, through Complicated Animals.

Credits: Written by Monica da Silva and Bruce Driscoll (Freedom Fry). Vocals: Monica da Silva, Bruce Driscoll Guitar: Bruce Driscoll Drums & Percussion: Chad Alger (Complicated Animals) Mixed by Chad Alger, Bruce Driscoll Mastered by Yoad Nevo

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